Images

the antidote for blocked artists.

Clearly, I’m a sucker for any book with projects or prompts.  Add in tons of current and full color art, and you might find yourself slightly overwhelmed!  Oh that Jealous Curator, and her insanely good taste…

Krysa, Danielle.  (also known as The Jealous Curator)CB
Creative Block:
Advice and Projects from 50 Successful Artists.
288pp.  Chronicle Books, 2014. $29.95
ISBN-10:1452118884
ISBN-13:978-1452118888
DDC 701.15

This project, coming from Danielle Krysa’s own desire to become unblocked, cannot—should not—be devoured in one sitting as I tried to do.  There’s just too much mining, too much good art, too many references sending me to Google this admired artist in Oakland and that series of bird collages from the guy cutting paper in the Midwest.  Danielle has chosen artists from a wide spectrum of disciplines (painters, illustrators, collage/mixed media, multidisciplinary, photography, ceramics, embroidery, paper cutting, installation).  Each entry for the 50 contributors has a short bio, a selection of work, and a shovel-full of questions about his or her particular creative process.  Danielle uses some questions on repeat: When did you first feel like an artist?  Or how do you feel when you are in your creative zone?  But there is tailoring too. Questions like: What are your tips for dealing with collages that are giving you trouble?  Do your commissioned projects drain or fuel your personal work?

There are some glistening gems of advice from artists who have ironed out their processes enough to write things like:
watercolor quotes
You will surely find other thought-provoking lines that resonate with you and your process, whatever your medium.

And there are a handful of artists who do not feel the pressure of a block—they’ve made a sort of peace with their muses, and allow that non-art time to serve as a transition, a breathing space between major projects.

But all 50 artists give you, the reader, a Creative unBlock. These delicious prompts &/or exercises are thoughtful nudges or smack-in-the-pants cattle prods to stir you up and get you MAKING. They range from breaking out of a rut by going for a walk and documenting your findings, or completely destroying a piece that has failed—or one that you love!—and rebuilding it. Some prompt you to leave art out in public, to be discovered and delighted by a stranger. There are challenges to help you mix things up, like move out of your natural medium and try something new. Catalog particular spots around your house, or arrange items pleasingly. Create a series of somethings. (I’m being intentionally vague because if you’re a working artist, writer, or maker, then you know the vacuous place called Uninspired. And this book would be a very handy antidote to have around when you’ve found yourself untethered in that barren land. And if you don’t know this space, then, as one artist’s claims: you’re lying). Though I do wonder what Danielle did regarding blocks before she amassed this collection of unblock exercises….

krysa quote

Danielle is no slouch to the visual world.  Her blog has become a spring-board for many up and coming artists, and for art-loving people who like to put interesting work on their walls.  Further, Danielle is making superb art as well, though she strikes me as veritably humble about it.  I’m not an art critic, but I know what I like, and I very much like what Danielle creates, especially her crisp collage and painted art with embroidered pops of color and texture.  Danielle vows to work through each of the challenges included in the book, and I can’t wait to see the fruits.

Find her at: thejealouscurator.com

Thanks, Danielle Krysa, for compiling a book so chock-full of great art by articulate and generous artists that I’m buying a rotisserie chicken for dinner tonight (instead of cooking) so I can keep working on my Creative unBlock #04 found-art sculpture exercise.

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purposeful crafting.

I love a flea market.  Used book sales.  Thrift stores.  And most especially, my local reuse center SCRAP.  We also have the grand dame of Northern California antique fairs at Alameda Point (first Sunday of the month).  Even if I’m making something with new supplies, I often add in a bit of old paper.  I feel like it anchors the piece in a wholly different time.  I also have crates of old books, vintage notions, and chipped plates all just waiting for divine inspiration.  Enter Blair Stocker’s new book, Wise Craft.

 

Stocker, Blair.

Wise Craft:Wise Craft front panel

Turning Thrift Store Finds, Fabric Scraps, and Natural Objects into Stuff You Love.

184pp.  Running Press, 2014. $20.

ISBN-10: 0762449691

ISBN-13: 978-0762449699

DDC 745.5

This soft-bound volume is jam-packed with ideas on resuscitating old things.  Its’ cover brings handicraft right into modern: embossed title cut from fabric and scraps, subtitle in a cursive chalk, author’s name on a garment label.  There are several tutorials simply illustrated by Lisa Congdon.  The book is well-indexed, and has a host of templates to help you complete the projects as seen.  Blair also recommends a crafter’s toolkit.  It’s a curated list that many people should have no trouble rounding up.  The book is arranged by season, though many projects could overlap.  I relish when cookbooks organize by season, and I can see why Blair takes this approach as we all go through seasons of creativity and making distinctly related to weather, light, and materials.

I find that the process of creating something new from a tired or neglected item makes it feel more special, more intentional.  I am not militantly “green” or obsessed with thrift.  I just find that creating original pieces from gathered goods gives me a more personal connection to my surroundings and environment.  It establishes a sense of value: of place, of family, of personal history.                          -Blair Stocker

Each of the 60 projects begins with a brief, but personal description; I enjoy knowing why and how a person was inspired to make something.  Some of Blair’s projects are very simple and easy for the new-to-crafting type.  This might be frustrating for the more seasoned DIY-er, but I prefer to see these seeds as starting points: how can I make that silhouette leather coaster more interesting for me (who loves to emboss/stitch leather).  The book is appropriate for all level of crafter.

Spring for Blair means cleaning and tidying, and the inspiration to make new things.  This chapter has home décor items like personalized statement dishes—easily accomplished with the right china marker, and a recycled flower mirror (the mirror frame has been embellished with soft fibers and felts cut into leaves and blossoms) that has me wracking my brain to remember where I tucked away those old sweaters I was saving for something special.  She made a series of glittered art wall pieces that features the Stocker Family made-up words.  I instantly thought of a short-list of words and phrases that would look great in glitterati for our house.

Summer, in the words of Blair, “is the peak season for garage sales.”  And when I saw her woven chair back, I was awed.  There are so many times when I pass up rattan or caned chairs because I’m slightly intimidated by the brittle material.  But this chair boasts a fresh seat and colorful woven backrest.  When I recently walked through Salvation Army, I heavily contemplated a gorgeous old chair with an upholstered seat, and a weathered rattan back.  I need to go back; I’m committed to trying something similar.

Fall is my favorite season–aside from that one holiday ALL arachnophobes loathe, therefore I do not decorate with webs or plastic creepies.  I stick to owls and ravens, pumpkins and bats.  So Blair’s spooky dishes are perfect for me.  Sweet, vintage plates with a seasonal surprise.  Even a drawing from a child—a mean pumpkin face or a grimacing candy corn—can be scanned and decaled onto a thrifted piece of china.   Also, the book features a tabletop garden that, even though it is spring right now, makes me want to renovate my current terrarium with rocks, sticks and driftwood.  It features three lonely succulents.  I tried to cajole my boys into a nature walk/treasure hunt for the purpose of terrarium adornments.  I have two sticks to show for it.  To be fair, they did present me with two stolen flower heads—one with a missing petal, and a feather that was supremely battered.  The flowers died by bedtime, and the feather is missing in action.  I think another walk is in order, but for now it looks like this:

terrarium

Another classic project from the book is the miniature faux taxidermy mounted in deep shadowboxes.  I adore shadowboxes.  The hard part is editing what goes into them, and this project has inspired me to keep it simple.  Blair’s shadowbox trio features a single, perched, plumed bird—fake, of course—and a simple, scripted label which is an opportunity to practice your calligraphy or old-school cursive.  Maybe even ask your fourth-grader to pen it out for you.  Where am I at with this project? I have three shadowbox candidates.  I have sticks and dowels for perches.  But I do not have acceptable faux birds.  And even though I’m inspired by Blair’s simple, vintage birds, I haven’t found any remotely natural-looking.  I got lost in an internet rabbit-hole searching for fabric bird tutorials.  And I now have two books on bird-making headed in my direction.

While this book has jump-started several ideas and 50% complete projects, I do have one start-to-finish to share: the bead-bombed tote bag.  Blair made hers from a woebegone tablecloth.  I used a piece of vintage fabric that I’ve been saving for twenty years.  Twenty.  I am so glad to have put this piece of fabric to use!  Further, I live in San Francisco, where reusable bags are a requirement for all shopping (or pay a bag fee, and live with the scrutiny).  I have many bags for the grocery shopping, but I like to have separate ones for the library or new sweaters.  Enter this tote.  I followed Blair’s instructions from start to finish.  I think this is a note-worthy comment since I usually see a picture, and try to wing it.  But, for the purpose of this review, the instructions are clearly written, and yield a great, sturdy tote.  Mine is lined with a medium weight canvas (per instructions) that should support a load from the library, or a long day at the flea market.  In the spirit of making it mine, I added a simple pocket, off-centered for  right-hand wear, for keys and phone.  I started a small patch of beading on the reverse side.  It adds a bit of interest to the old fabric.  I am not sure how it will wear.  I considered sewing the beads in place, but for now, the fabric glue is completely invisible, and the beads are staying put!

beaded tote  bloom for wisecraft

Like the rest of us artists and makers, winter is a scramble to create holiday gifts, décor, cards, and treats, and if you live in reach of polar vortexes, major efforts to stay cozy.  Thus many of Blair’s winter projects are of the felted and fleeced variety.  My favorite from this chapter is a remix of the spring flower mirror, simplified into a single bloom brooch.  (I added one spring-like flower to the strap/bag intersection of my tote!)  This is the perfect, speedy gift for teachers and cousins. It would be a beautiful gift embellishment, or grace a bottle of wine or craft beer.  Or make a collection for your caroling group.  The thing I love most about this idea is that I’m thinking about it NOW, in May.  So I can spend the next few weeks hunting for tartans and plaids when no one else cares.  I feel ahead of the holidays already!

You can find Blair in all her handmade glory at: http://blairstocker.com/

Thanks, Blair Stocker, for crafting a book that presses into service all those special cast-offs I’ve been saving for just the right project.

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