Category Archives: Collage

Art & Craft Merger

Last week I was on a terrific bird hunt to make the Faux Taxidermy project from Blair Stocker’s Wisecraft.

IMG_2272

There were birds to be had on Etsy and Ebay, but I’m impatient sometimes, and the crafting cannot wait.  I went to my local Beverly’s, and happily birds were 30% off, which is great because I had big plans to dissect her.

fake bird

This is an example of the same brand/different bird on Amazon.  I might have actually bought and used this finch had it been in stock.  Instead, I bought a really weird looking canvas bird, and I am remiss for not photographing it for you.  But again, I am sometimes impatient when crafting.  The plan for this bird was to make a shadow box, featuring the bird, and a simple calligraphy label.  I love when crafty plans go awry.

Concurrently, I was reading and creating from Randel Plowman’s Collage Workbook.  I was making 5-minute collages and bird-themed collages and map-based collages.  While the collages were drying under a weighty American Heritage Dictionary, I dismantled the bird.  I also rummaged around for the sturdiest box to house my faux bird.  I have a collection of small, strong, hinge-lidded boxes from my Studio Calico Project Life® subscription*.  They are very good quality boxes that arrive monthly, and I knew that I would find a project for them at some point.

Happily, the bird fit into the box!  So I continued with my bird re-feathering, and since it had a metal clip instead of feet, I fashioned some legs and feet from a small piece of floral wire which—all of a sudden—magnetically stuck to the top of the box!  These strong magnets on either side easily hold a small bird upright.

bird foot meets magnet

And while I was delighted to have discovered that a bird could sit on top of the shadow box, I was foiled about what would go IN the box.  Another bird?  (I had several bird-making books on hold at the library, plus an old issue of Somerset Studios with a bird-maker interview).  And all the while, those collages dried flat under the dictionary behind me.  You know where this is going.

Back to the bird:

bird pattern making

After I had carefully taken all the canvas off the foam core, I laid each piece down and traced out the pattern.  Her tail was sort of over the top for her size, so I didn’t build that into her remake.  I kept the same beak, eyes, and wing shape, but simplified the tail, and added some vintage feather bits to her wings.  I cut new pieces of fabric from a vintage linen remnant, and glued them all back together onto the foam core.  I bent two small feet from floral wire, and left them green—she’s already a fabric bird, no need to force the faux issue.

Then I sanded the box.  It had a smooth surface, and the paint wouldn’t stick without deglossing; in hindsight, I probably should have primed it too.  But, as it was in the middle of dinner preparations, and I was throwing together pasta and sautéing vegetables in the kitchen while painting a second coat on my bird-box in the garage.  A juggling act.  Forget priming.  I used a small tester pot from Benjamin Moore called Deep in Thought.  (I have many of these tester pots, and I vow to find other small paint projects to use them up!)

Once the bird and box were fully dried, I set them on my desk, and thought maybe a bird poem would go inside—Emily Dickinson’s “Hope is the thing with feathers?”  Lyrics from a song— Jolie Holland’s “The Littlest Bird?”

bird complete

I think this is the point that I pulled out the collages, some of which were portrait in orientation, and wouldn’t fit. But were four horizontal, and fit nicely.  And that made for one happy maker.  A tilt on Blair Stocker’s lovely bird shadow-box-turned-evolving-display for collages!  And that, good people of the internet, is how I got sidetracked from Blair’s project idea, but I don’t think she’ll mind.  I still love Blair’s bird boxes, and will likely make a set as soon as I have the right birds.

The box is light-weight, and I plan to affix it to the wall with a piece of Command Strip, though I haven’t decided where to hang it.  I think a series is in order.

bird and collage

 

*Project Life® is a system of memory-keeping designed by Becky Higgins meant to stream-line photos and scrapbooking.  Studio Calico is a design company who builds fun papery kits in addition to Becky’s line.  I happen to love these monthly small boxes of supplies, and use the contents for all sorts of crafting.  I also maintain a Family Book—my own version of Project Life, and perhaps I’ll share my process for that project here.

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Collage for Keeps

As a mom with two very active boys, the “get started” part of any project is often my biggest hurdle.  It’s easy for me to derail when I don’t have the right ingredient, the perfect shade of paint, or an entire bag of semi-sweet chocolate chips.  (I do have a neighbor who buys her chocolate chips in bulk, so there is wiggle room on that one).  My chocolate chip neighbor—and friend, opera singer, (& editor: thanks Ann!)—will often send one of her boys running down to our house for large sheets of paper, pipe cleaners, or fabric.  It’s the best kind of neighborhood smack in the middle of our beautiful city.

Plowman, Randel.The+Collage+Workbook
The Collage Workbook:
How to Get Started and Stay Inspired.
Illustrated. 132pp.  Lark Crafts, 2012. $17.95
ISBN-10:1454701994
ISBN-13:978-1454701996
702.812—P726c

But collage!  Getting Started!  Randel’s approach requires very little start-up materials.  You can jump right in with an old National Geographic, scissors, and glue.  You can use what you have.  The phone book you don’t reference, but they insist on delivering.  Junk mail.  Magazines.  Workbook pages from your kid’s homework, especially with some scrawling.  The envelope from your tea bag: Harney & Son’s Paris, hands down. Randel recommends a few other supplies like inks, crayons, paints and a bone folder.  And he discusses foundations for your collage, adhesives, cutting tools, and other media.

plowman quotes

Randel also suggests printing some collage materials on tracing paper.  I love this idea for the semi-transparent quality and layering it creates.  I receive a weekly newsletter from Dover Publications, which features public domain imagery samples that can be saved directly to your computer. I created a few sheets of these vintage images and printed them to add to my bin of materials.

This is a book to help you investigate your own collage style.  The only way to get there is to get started and make.  And make some more.  Collage can be as simple as a few scraps of paper combined in an interesting way. Sometimes, seeing two distinct items conjoined is enough of a commentary.  Randel is a pro at creating.  Several years ago, he started a blog called Collage a Day, and committed to using his collection of ephemera.  His dedication to the art form resulted in hundreds of collages, many followers and collectors of his work, and this book.  He wants us all to make collages!  And he encourages us to jump right in.  This enthusiasm folds into his first exercise: Five 5-minute collages.  Five sheets of watercolor paper cut to 3X5, five minutes per card, and twenty-five minutes later you have surprising results.  Here are a few of mine:

For me, the collages begin with a piece or two of interesting background paper.  The secondary images inject color and texture (snippet of Braille, origami paper, upside down popsicles*). Then, my favorite part, adding in bits of detail (postage stamps, vintage labels, packing tape transfers, washi tape). I layer rubber stamping in plain black ink, and toner image transfers as well.  A few of the collages have some machine stitching, which looks good on a window ledge, since the light peeks through the needle holes.                     *I regret that I do not know the source of this image.

After completing my small series of collages, I took a step back and observed what I was inclined to use.  Old book pages, tattered sheet music, and a forest map.  Birds. Postage. And also texture.  There is a scrap of Braille glued down inversely, zigzag stitching, and a stencil that I spackled with Texture Magic (by Delta/Plaid, which doesn’t seem to be available).  Texture is where the internet fails us all.  I foresee combining more stitching with paper and fabrics, more layers, more pinked edges.

This is a great book for those new to collage, or needing to refresh their style.  But seasoned collage artists will still find value in many of the exercises, and inspiration in Randel’s work.  The fifty exercises vary between color studies and image pairings, geometrics and typography, maps and storybooks.  The  collages feature birds, flowers, and power lines.  And he even incorporates the scribbling of a child.  My favorite collage of Randal’s is called Ten, featured in the section on working with Numbers.  I love the bits of penciled arithmetic, a chemical compound, the digits 10 and word ten, and a vintage bird.  If you search for Randel’s collages, you’ll find hundreds to peek at online.  That alone is hugely inspiring.  Plus, he included a duplicate-able image library in the book to get you started.

Find more of Randel’s art for viewing and for sale, plus collage ideas at: randelplowman.com, acollageaday.blogspot.com.  The Collage Workbook blog features other collage artists: www.thecollageworkbook.blogspot.com

Thanks, Randel Plowman, for writing this book on jump-starting an intuitive collage practice that encourages me to collect (even more) ephemera and forlorn manuals to build into curious vignettes of jump ropers and the U.S. Post Office.*

*among many other agreeable and strange topics.

 

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