Birds, flowers, and book-binding.

I started my U.S. State Bird & Flower project on a whim, and for a moment, it crossed my mind that perhaps I should begin the project in a fresh sketchbook.  My existing sketchbook was built for the Sketchbookery class I took with Mary Ann Moss over at Dispatch from LA.  It’s a great, serviceable sketchbook. The downfall is that I used a mix of paper for pages: watercolor paper and illustration paper.  Regular illustration paper is not equal to the watercolor task.  So when I first painted the bird and flower for Alabama, and saw the prospect of 49 more pages, I did a quick tally (I had only 5 watercolor spreads left) and starting the making of a new sketchbook with exclusively watercolor paper pages.  I like to use old book covers for my sketchbook covers, but with the imaginary deadline of finite pages, I ended up making a book from scratch.  I covered two pieces of thick book board with a remnant of book cloth, and stitch-bound the folios to the soft binding.

sketchBOOK

sketchBOOK innards

Then, for fun, I used metal stamps and hammered “sketchBOOK” into the sun-bleached cover.  I lined the inner covers with a bit of marbled paper that I had been hoarding.  It’s really simple, as far as covers go, but it is up and running, and that was my ultimate goal.  This new book measures slightly larger than my first.  My only regret was binding it with RED waxed linen thread.  It is very loud on a blank page.  Next week is SFPL’s Spring Book Sale over at Ft. Mason, so I’m hoping to find suitable covers for sketchbooks #3, #4, and maybe #5.

As you might recall, I’m working alphabetically through the states.  This week I’m sharing California, Colorado, Connecticut, and Delaware.

CA

Oh how I fretted over this quail; I really tried to do it justice.  California quails have an iridescent breast.  I used some silver watercolor paint mixed in with the grey, and it does catch the light.  His eye and beak were challenging, and his body even more so.  But success with the poppies!  This cluster is based on a group that popped up along our front walk.  I placed a sheet of white paper behind it and took several photos—but did not pick or cut it.  The map’s coastline: challenging.  It’s easy to get involved around the Bay Area, with which I am most familiar.  I lost a bit of perspective down around San Diego, and may have missed many little islands.

CO

I like how the Lark Bunting’s eye came out, but am unhappy with his beak.  It looks more duck-like than a real Lark Bunting beak.  I thought a nearly-black bird would be easy, but black paint loses dimension, and he looks rather flat as a result.  The Colorado Columbine is meant to be the purple and yellow variety.  And as I searched, I saw some gorgeous specimens in an array of shades.  I would have benefited from seeing how this flower grows as well.  The map: easy.

CT

My native state!  The American Robin’s eye is my favorite thus far.  The photo I used was very high resolution so I zoomed right in, and paid close attention.  It totally makes the bird so much more lifelike.  I should have done the same level of detail on his feet.  (Next chance for a robin: Wisconsin).  The mountain laurel brought back a flood of memories that any Northwest Corner kid will conjure.  The map: the coastline is a challenge, much like California.  And I may have elongated that thumb which includes Fairfield County.

DE

First, there are not enough photos of Blue Hen Chickens on the internet!  Delawareans, take note!  But I found a few good images and aimed to render the plumage properly.  I found many great peach blossom photos, and oh how I wish we had a pair in our yard (I love peaches).  I don’t know if they are as fragrant as the citrus blossoms, but they are lovely in color, and remind me of cherry blossoms, which bloom very early here in San Francisco. The map: I’m pretty sure that Delaware has a bit of a tilt, thought this version may be exaggerated.  The jagged edge follows the Delaware River, and I was interested to find it smoother than an ocean coastline.

bird books

Books: borrowed & beloved.  This is the book stack that is keeping me informed and inspired.

Thus far, I’m learning to look closely at bird eyes, and the tiny feathers that neighbor it.  I’m looking at how buds burst from a tree branch.  I’m paying attention to the shape of states, and what happens when their edges meet the sea.  I’m also delighting in the Latin names of the birds and flowers.  Mimus polyglottos, Gallus gallus, and Callipepla californica.  I do not speak nor read Latin, but I appreciate specificity, and being able to search for imagery using both common and Latin names.  Perhaps I’m getting way ahead of myself, but I love this project so much that I cannot wait to expand upon it. There is a WORLD of birds and flowers out there…

As always, I’m posting regular images of my progress on Instagram; follow along there if you like.  Otherwise, I’ll be back next week with: Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, and Idaho.

PS: I’m excited to tell you that I have an indoor hibiscus in bloom! Perfect timing for Hawaii.  And I noticed that a lilac is blooming at a nearby church; the Lilac is the state flower of New Hampshire which is a ways off in the line-up, but I plan to skip ahead and draw it since drawing from life is much more fun.

hibiscus

President Hibiscus. Hibiscus rosa-sinensis ‘President’

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2 thoughts on “Birds, flowers, and book-binding.

  1. melisnorth says:

    Gorgeous handbound book and really awesome project! I love the idea of using art as a way of learning, and you’ve done a brilliant job capturing those birds and flowers. I look forward to keeping up with you and seeing it develop.

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